The Dust Bowl & The Great Depression

The Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian Prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940).

During the drought of the 1930s, without natural anchors to keep the soil in place, it dried, turned to dust, and blew away eastward and southward in large dark clouds. At times the clouds blackened the sky reaching all the way to East Coast cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. Much of the soil ended up deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, carried by prevailing winds, which were in part created by the dry and bare soil conditions.

The Great Depression

 The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression in the decade preceding World War II. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations, but in most countries it started in about 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s or early 1940s. It was the longest, most widespread, and deepest depression of the 20th century.

The Great Depression had devastating effects in virtually every country, rich and poor.

In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world’s economy can decline. The depression originated in the U.S., starting with the fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929 and became worldwide news with the  stock market crash of October 29, 1929. From there, it quickly spread to almost every country in the world.

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2 thoughts on “The Dust Bowl & The Great Depression

  1. This started well but faded quickly you are going to need quite a lot more Jonathan as this part represents a large part of the marks and at present is far too light

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